Frances Hawkes2019-01-29T14:22:36+00:00

Project Description

Job: Research Fellow University of Greenwich
Course: BSc Hons Environmental Science 2009 I PhD Medical Entomology 2013

Frances passionately believes in applying science to solve global problems. She has demonstrated this belief throughout her education and career at the university, most recently by working on a pioneering mosquito trap that mimics human characteristics – an innovative solution against malaria which affects over 200 million people every year. The trap is now part of a project funded by the Medical Research Council, and was also featured on a BBC programme.

As an undergraduate, Frances co-founded an environmental society, and successfully lobbied for a full-time sustainability officer and allotment facilities for students. Four years later, the university was named the UK’s greenest.

During her PhD, she presented research to Parliament, funded and ran ‘bug safaris’ for children in Medway, and successfully designed and built an app with peers that was picked up by the UK’s Field Studies Council. Little wonder she was the inaugural winner of the university’s ‘Student of the Year’ award in 2012.

Now working at the university’s Natural Resources Institute, other parts of her work bring her closer to home, as she monitors invasive mosquito species in south-east England with Public Health England and investigates how to manage mosquitoes in wetlands as part of a major interdisciplinary project at the university.

“Our lecturers were also world-leading researchers, and it was there that I began to see that research is both fascinating and powerful.”

Frances Hawkes

Researcher. Problem solver. Environmental campaigner.

Job: Research Fellow University of Greenwich
Course: BSc Hons Environmental Science 2009 I PhD Medical Entomology 2013

“Our lecturers were also world-leading researchers, and it was there that I began to see that research is both fascinating and powerful.”

Frances passionately believes in applying science to solve global problems. She has demonstrated this belief throughout her education and career at the university, most recently by working on a pioneering mosquito trap that mimics human characteristics – an innovative solution against malaria which affects over 200 million people every year. The trap is now part of a project funded by the Medical Research Council, and was also featured on a BBC programme.

As an undergraduate, Frances co-founded an environmental society, and successfully lobbied for a full-time sustainability officer and allotment facilities for students. Four years later, the university was named the UK’s greenest.

During her PhD, she presented research to Parliament, funded and ran ‘bug safaris’ for children in Medway, and successfully designed and built an app with peers that was picked up by the UK’s Field Studies Council. Little wonder she was the inaugural winner of the university’s ‘Student of the Year’ award in 2012.

Now working at the university’s Natural Resources Institute, other parts of her work bring her closer to home, as she monitors invasive mosquito species in south-east England with Public Health England and investigates how to manage mosquitoes in wetlands as part of a major interdisciplinary project at the university.